Nestled on a tiny lot in Ashland, Oregon, this delightful cottage was one of Heiland Hoff Architecture's most challenging projects.  Due to zoning restrictions, the dwelling was limited to only 900 square feet.  Architects generally get paid more to design large houses, but the small ones are actually more difficult.  Furthermore, the lot slopes steeply to the North, making it more difficult to access the sun.  The solution was to build up; the planning department limited the square footage, but not the volume.  We built as high as we could without casting a shadow onto the neighboring property.  The construction crew called this house "the church of the holy rafters".  

This residence has been published in several newspaper and magazine articles. It is also featured in the City of Ashland's Parade of Homes, an event that showcases green and passive solar houses.  Every appointment is designed to access and amplify the meager available sunlight. A line of double clerestories brings filtered Southern light and warmth into every room in the house, including the master suite on the North side of the house. Water is heated by active solar panels on the roof, and the entire house is wired for future photovoltaic power.  

The owner regularly hold dinner parties, entertaining up to 30 people at a time in her 900 square foot house!

The owner regularly hold dinner parties, entertaining up to 30 people at a time in her 900 square foot house!

Because the house is constructed on a North-facing slope, every effort was made to maximize solar exposure.

Because the house is constructed on a North-facing slope, every effort was made to maximize solar exposure.